Marshall Lerner Condition

The Marshall-Lerner condition When evaluating the impact of a currency fluctuation on the balance of trade we should consider the Marshall-Lerner condition. We normally assume that when a currency depreciates imports fall and exports increase and therefore balance of trade improves.   When a currency appreciates we normally assume exports fall and imports increase and thus… Continue reading Marshall Lerner Condition

Is a strong currency desirable – Part 2

Yesterday we discussed whether a strong currency was desirable in terms of the macro-economic objectives of an economy. I concluded that while it helps keep inflation under control it is fairly damaging to the other macro-economic objectives. But this is a fairly simple analysis and conclusion, how can we take it further? Perhaps we need… Continue reading Is a strong currency desirable – Part 2

Is a ‘strong’ currency desirable?

Is a ‘strong’ currency desirable? Whether a strong currency is good for your country or not is a very common question I encounter when students first start learning about exchange rates and trade. Anyone new to economics often assumes that a strong currency is desirable. This is understandable but fairly simplistic. Firstly, the word ‘strong’… Continue reading Is a ‘strong’ currency desirable?

Why do we need to exchange currency?

Exchange Rates Definition: An exchange rate is the rate at which one currency is traded for another. For example if 1 Pound Sterling buys 1.5 US Dollars, then the exchange rate is £1 to $1.5.  Why exchange currencies? Currency is exchanged, or traded, continuously around the world. Currency is traded for a variety of reasons:… Continue reading Why do we need to exchange currency?